Rotarians learn history of alcohol

Last week, July 26, 2022, Rotarian Jim Mayhugh presented a “History of Alcohol in South Carolina”. Alcohol was made and produced from the earliest times, as a homegrown and distilled crop. Beginning about 1860, production distilleries became more common. In 1893, South Carolina began regulating alcohol sales with the South Carolina Distillery, and legal alcohol bottles were made, and stamped with the Distillery logo. The system at best was inefficient and often crooked and it ceased to exist in 1907. South Carolina went “dry” in 1916, ahead of the national prohibition in 1920, which lasted until 1934. Alcohol during this period became a prescription “drug” and was handled by pharmacies but was also known for speakeasies and bootleg liquor. After 1934, South Carolina had the red dot liquor stores, and consumption in restaurants was handled though set ups provided by the establishments and “brown bagging” by the customer. This lasted until 1973, when the mini-bottle was used, and then, free pour. Jim illustrated the talk with bottles to show the changes that occurred. Thanks Jim for the great history lesson.

Rotarians learn history of alcohol